Sap-suckers & sooty mould

Sooty mould is not a plant disease as such but various species of fungi, which grow on the sticky honeydew excreted by many species of sap-sucking insects. A very thick mould layer on leaves may cause a reduction in photosynthesis in plants, which can result in leaves falling prematurely. The main concern to gardeners (apart from the sap-sucking pests which caused it) is that a thick covering of sooty mould on a plant’s leaves is downright ugly.

Sooty mould is a serious problem for the horticultural industry. Ugly plants are unsaleable. Similarly in the citrus industry, the main economic damage caused by mealybugs is by the downgrading of fruit quality due to sooty mould growing on mealybug honeydew. The picture below shows a leaf infested by soft scale insects and the sooty mould they cause – pretty ugly eh?

Sooty mold

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Tomato fly – revisited

An email conversation with an entomologist from New South Wales prompted the addition of a paragraph (in bold) to this article from about a year ago.

I picked a tomato off the bush the other day and noticed a little hole in it. I cut it open and saw that the contents were looking a bit ordinary, as if it was about to rot. Under higher magnification I could see the culprits – fly larvae – yep, maggots! The image below shows a close-up of one.

tomato fly larva

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Where do insects go in winter?

Insects are ectothermic meaning they don’t generate their own body heat, and rely on external sources to regulate their body temperature. Freezing temperatures are life threatening to many insects, so how do they survive winter?

One July morning I went down to my vegetable garden to see how the plants had survived the deep freeze (-3°C) of the night before. I wasn’t surprised to find my brassicas were covered in ice crystals, but I didn’t expect to find a cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) larva also encrusted in ice. I decided to keep an eye on it, so after the day warmed up a bit I revisited the garden to find the caterpillar happily munching on the plant. How did it do it?

Cabbage white larva Continue reading Where do insects go in winter?

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