Tomato fly – revisited

An email conversation with an entomologist from New South Wales prompted the addition of a paragraph (in bold) to this article from about a year ago.

I picked a tomato off the bush the other day and noticed a little hole in it. I cut it open and saw that the contents were looking a bit ordinary, as if it was about to rot. Under higher magnification I could see the culprits – fly larvae – yep, maggots! The image below shows a close-up of one.

tomato fly larva

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What’s good about ants? Plenty.

Many people, especially gardeners, only see ants as pests, but they couldn’t be further from the truth. These days I work weekends in a garden centre, and when summer arrived every second customer I encountered wanted a product to kill ants. One person even asked me for the “Agent Orange” of ant insecticides! They were somewhat bemused when I asked “What sort of ants are they, and why do you want to kill them?”

ponerine ant
This harmless ponerine ant is holding a water drop in its mandibles.

Continue reading What’s good about ants? Plenty.

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Tomato fly

I picked a tomato off the bush the other day and noticed a little hole in it. I cut it open and saw that the contents were looking a bit ordinary, as if it was about to rot. Under higher magnification I could see the culprits – fly larvae – yep, maggots! The image below shows a close-up of one.

tomato fly larva

Continue reading Tomato fly

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Fear and loathing

It happened one day at primary school back in the 1960’s. “It’s biting me, it’s biting me!!” the boy screamed as he sprinted past me. He then collapsed on the ground in flamboyant B-grade movie style, shrieking loudly. I ran up to him and could see the culprit clinging to his leg, a very large but harmless moth which I now know it to be one of the ‘rain moths’ of the family Hepialidae (below).

Trictena atripalpis Continue reading Fear and loathing

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Gall-inducing insects

Have you ever noticed strange lumps and bumps on the leaves and stems of native plants? Galls are especially common on gum trees and wattles, and they are abnormal plant growths that form in response to invasion of plant tissue by a variety of organisms. Galls can be caused by certain species of wasps, flies, beetles, psyllids, coccids, thrips, moths and aphids, as well as by nematodes, mites, bacteria or fungi. This post concentrates on some common gall-inducing insects found in Australia. Continue reading Gall-inducing insects

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Night of the Bloodsuckers (Part 2)

Night of the Bloodsuckers (Part 1) prompted several conversations, and people had lots of suggestions about how to control or repel mosquitoes. The repellent suggestions included lemongrass, citronella, and garlic oil spray (a product not available in Australia as far as I know). In addition to emptying pot trays, bird baths etc regularly to stop mosquitoes breeding, one correspondent reminded us not to forget emptying bromeliads. One ingenious person suggested deliberately placing buckets of water around the garden to encourage mosquitoes to lay their eggs in them, and then emptying them out. That’s using buckets as a trap! Thanks for all your suggestions.

dead mosquito Continue reading Night of the Bloodsuckers (Part 2)

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