Tomato Russet Mite control

There I was testing out some video equipment in the garden and later realised that I had enough footage to edit into a video story. The story teller has put himself in the video as well!

In this video I talk about controlling/suppressing tomato russet mite (Aculops lycopersici) so that the last of my tomatoes can ripen.

Tomato russet mite is a widespread, microscopic but serious sap-sucking pest of tomato plants particularly during hot weather. The pest may enter your garden on hot winds. Adult mites are minute (about 0. 2mm long), torpedo-shaped and white to yellowish in colour. Nymphs are similar in shape, white and smaller.

Tomato russet mites usually feed on the underside of leaves. The first symptoms are usually seen on the lower leaves and progressively move up the plant. Leaves initially turn a silvery colour, but later turn bronze, curl downwards and become dry. Stems and leaf stalks become smooth and brownish.

Tomato russet mites breed extremely quickly and can complete their life cycle in less than a week during hot weather. Each female lays about 50 eggs, which combined with their rapid life cycle means numbers of mites increase very rapidly. The mites can be controlled with sprays of insecticidal soap, lime sulphur, or wettable sulphur.

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2 Replies to “Tomato Russet Mite control”

  1. Nice little video Denis! Oh, and nice little bit of guitar!!
    Would it not be possible to spray with say Natrasoap as a preventative
    while the plants are smaller?
    Do you have mentioned anywhere on your site/page the equipment
    you use..eg, mics ,cameras, gimbals. ect ?
    cheers
    Glen

    • Hi Glen. Thanks for your comments. Yes you could spray Natrasoap earlier if you know the mites are there. This year the mites were particularly rapid in their breeding due to the scorching temperatures, and they got away (as you can see). Natrasoap has no residual action, so it wouldn’t work if the mites aren’t there (i.e as a preventative spray in advance). Hope that makes sense.
      Video gear? I don’t have a page on equipment yet, as I am still assembling it all. Maybe in the future?
      Cheers
      Denis

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